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Why we should care about

Hawaiian Homelands

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The members of the first Hawaiian Homes Commission were (L-R), Rudolf M. Duncan, Rev. Akaiko Akana, Prince Kūhiō, George P. Cooke, and Gov. W.R. Farrington.

Hawaiian Homes Commission Act (HHCA)

Passed by Congress and signed into law by President Warren Harding on July 9, 1921, the HHCA provides for the rehabilitation of the native Hawaiian people with at least 50% Hawaiian blood through a government-sponsored homesteading program:

  • 99-year homestead leases at an annual rental of $1 (with lease extensions for an aggregate term not to exceed 199 years) 

  • Leases to be used for residential, agricultural, aquacultural, or pastoral purposes. 

  • Financial assistance through direct loans or loan guarantees for home construction, replacement / repair, development of farms & ranches; technical assistance to farmers & ranchers; operation of water systems 

By the Numbers:

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203K

Acres set aside for Hawaiian homesteading
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10K

beneficiaries with homestead leases
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28K

Native Hawaiians on the waiting list
As HHCA passed 101 years ago, an average of 100 leases has been awarded per year. At this pace, it would take Hawaii an additional 280 years to fulfill its promise to the 28K Native Hawaiians on the waitlist.

The HHCA promise:

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Land
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Funding
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Water
Locations of designated Hawaiian Homelands:
Location of the land is just as important of a conversation as the implementation and oversight of granting leases.
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"Integrity is doing what you said you would do. It means you keep your promises."
- Theodore Wilhelm Engstrom

Let's Talk Story

I'd love to hear your ideas and thoughts on this topic.

Please email me at valerie@valeriecwang.com.

Together, we can make a difference.